Thursday, March 1, 2007

What so Wrong?


Tony Dungy's and Lovie Smith's skin color, they've got a stronger bond than being the first African-American head coaches to lead their teams to the Super Bowl. The bond of their common Christian faith is becoming increasingly evident as media scrutiny intensifies surrounding the nation's highest-profile sporting event.
"The Lord set this up in a way that no one would believe it," Dungy told reporters after his Indianapolis Colts beat the New England Patriots to qualify for Super Bowl XLI. "The Lord tested us a lot this year, but he set this up to get all the glory."

This is common for winners of sporting events to quote “ Give God the Glory” but my question is how much do we really feel God has to do with the results or the outcomes of events.
Is there a level of hypocracity when prayer is done in ther locker room? And if both teams pray what if any part does God play in the events outcome?
Last, if God does not play in part int the events outcome what is the purpose for prayer?
Here is on response I got from another Blog
Not all Prayer is Good or Done for the Right Motives.

(Matthew 6:5) "And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by men. I tell you the truth, they have received their reward in full."

(Mark 12:40) "They devour widows' houses and for a show make lengthy prayers. Such men will be punished most severely."

I find that there is also a tendency by many Christians to treat God as though he were a cosmic Santa Claus. They are being taught by "name and claim" preachers that God is supposed to shower them with selfish material blessings at their request. Because they pray, they expect God to make them rich, but what did Christ say to the rich young man?

(Matthew 19:21) Jesus answered, "If you want to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me." When the young man heard this, he went away sad, because he had great wealth. Then Jesus said to his disciples, "I tell you the truth, it is hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven. Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God."

None of these "name and claim" preachers seems to want to talk about the warnings in the Bible about the deceitfulness of riches. No one seems to like this particular verse:

(James 4:3) "Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts."

Make me rich, give me everything I want, take all these obstacles from my path, remove these trials, tribulations and burdens from me. What did James say?

(James 1:2) "Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith develops perseverance. Perseverance must finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything."



I find it sad that people will pay big money to sit on an icy cold bleacher to watch grown men wrestle over a pig skin. You can't get most of them to sit on a warm padded pew to hear the word of God for free. Even sadder, if they actually choose to go to Church, the Preacher probally won't teach them to pray for repentance, for character development, for the weak, the sick, the abused, the down trodden. It is much more likely that he will tell them they should pray for wealth and by the way don't forget his 10%.

I can think of many things to include in my prayers but honestly I think that the outcomes of sporting events are trivial in the grand scheme of things. When there are children starving, souls being eternally lost, Church's and their leaders fallen and corrupted, paedophile Priests, and a thousand other weighty issues to pray about, why should I concern myself with the outcome of games? Are there not more urgent and important things for us to petition God over?
Here is a link to an article I wrote recently called The Power of Prayer.


Brother In Christ

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